Profiteroles with Custard Cream and Chocolate Sauce

IMG_5319

I believe that if we write too many words about Profiteroles, we will ruin the experience of enjoying them. So let’s just conjure up a few words to describe them: liquid chocolate draped over a soft pouch filled with tender cream; producing images from childhood that the world was almost perfect and nothing could go wrong. Did I destroy the experience with too many words? I hope not.

Profiteroles straight out of the oven

IMG_5293Profiteroles are wonderful, however because they can be a little tricky to make (especially the choux pastry dough), I am providing step-by-step instructions. If they don’t turn out perfect the first time, don’t be discouraged- keep on trying. They will still be delicious!

(Also, please see my post Profiteroles Re-visited for more tips)!

The Recipe – with Tips!  (see printable version below)

Choux Pastry

  • 250 ml (1 cup) water
  • 90 g (6 tbsp.) butter, cubed
  • 150 g (1 cup) plain flour
  • pinch salt
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 3-4 eggs

Directions

  • Pre-heat oven to 425 F (220 C). Combine water and butter in a saucepan and bring just to the boil.
  • Remove pan from the heat. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, salt and sugar. In one go, add these dry ingredients to the water/butter mixture. Over medium heat, stir with a wooden spoon until the mixture forms a dough and falls away from the sides of the pan. Remove from heat and let cool for 5 minutes.
  • Tip: It’s important to let the dough cool a little, otherwise you may ‘cook’ the eggs when you add them in the next step! To help the dough cool, I work it back and forth a little using the back of a spoon.

    Stir until the dough falls away from the sides of the pan

    Stir until the dough falls away from the sides of the pan

  • Beginning with three eggs, beat in one egg at a time, stirring in each egg until the dough is smooth and the egg is fully incorporated into the mixture. After the third egg, the dough should be elastic and fall easily away from your spoon or spatula.  If the dough is still a bit stiff, then add another 1/2 egg or another full egg until the dough reaches the right consistency; the dough should not be ‘runny’ like pancake batter, but smooth and elastic.
  • Tip: If your dough winds up being too ‘runny’, then try adding a little more flour.
After adding the eggs, the dough should be smooth and elastic- not runny.

After adding the eggs, the dough should be smooth and elastic- not runny.

  • Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Using a piping bag with a large tipped nozzle, pipe balls of dough onto the tray (spaced at least 2 inches apart), using about 2 tbsp. of dough for each ball. Pipe in concentric circles starting from the center and working outwards. Smooth down the ‘pointy tip’ of the dough ball using a wet finger.
  • Tip: don’t make the puff balls too big- about 2.5 inches in diameter is a good size. To pipe your balls, you could also fill a large Ziploc bag with the dough and pipe the balls from a small hole cut from the corner of the bag.
Pipe the dough using a piping bag with a large nozzle hole.

Pipe the dough using a piping bag with a large nozzle hole.

  • Place in the oven and bake for 10 minutes at 425 F (220 C), then lower the temperature to 375 F. (190 C.) for the remaining 10-15 minutes. The pastry balls will be done when they puff up and become golden. Each ball should feel light and airy, with a crisp exterior.
  • Tip: In order to achieve the crisp exterior of the puff balls, you need to first put them into the oven with a high temperature of f 425 F (220 C) and bake for about 10 minutes, before lowering the temperature. Otherwise, your puff balls will probably deflate quickly after they come out of the oven. However, even if they do deflate, don’t worry, they will still taste good!
The puff balls should be crisp on the outside when baked.

The puff balls should be crisp on the outside when baked.

  • Remove the tray from the oven and turn off the oven; slit a small hole in the base of each pastry ball to release any steam. Return the tray to the oven for another few minutes to dry out the inside of the puff balls.

The Custard Cream Filling

  • 250 ml (1 cup) milk
  • 175 ml (3/4 cup heavy cream)
  • 2 tsp vanilla flavouring
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 75 g (1/3 cup) caster sugar
  • 50 g (1/3 cup) flour

Directions

  • Warm the milk, cream and vanilla flavoring together over medium heat- do not boil.
  • In a separate bowl, whisk together the sugar and egg yolks, then add the flour.
  • Over medium heat, gradually add small amounts of the egg/sugar mixture to the milk/cream mixture. Continue whisking until the mixture thickens-  then place in the fridge until chilled- the custard will continue to thicken as it chills.
  • Tip: Make sure the temperature of your milk/cream mixture is not too hot as you add the egg/sugar mixture, otherwise the eggs may start to ‘curdle.’ After thickening,the custard should still be able to pour easily; if it becomes too thick, then add a bit more cream or milk.
The custard should still be able to pour easily- if too thick, add more cream or milk.

The custard should still be able to pour easily- if too thick, add more cream or milk.

  • When the custard has chilled, lift the top of each puff ball with you fingers and spoon 1-2 tsps. of custard into each ball. Alternatively, you could pipe the custard into each puff ball, however I feel it is easiest to simply ‘spoon’ it in.
Lift the top of each puff ball and fill with custard.

Lift the top of each puff ball and fill with custard.

Chocolate Sauce

  • 113 g (3/4 cup) dark semi-sweet baking chocolate
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 65 ml (1/4cup) thickened cream
  • 2 tbsp. sugar

Directions

  • Over low heat, melt together the chocolate and butter. Mix in the cream and sugar and stir until the sauce is thick and smooth.
  • To serve, place one or two cream puffs on a plate and cover with a little chocolate sauce.
  • Tip: You could also melt the chocolate by putting it in a bowl placed over a pan of simmering water. This will prevent the chocolate from heating up too quickly and ‘seizing’ (that is, turning into a hard, grainy lump).

P.S. I’d love it if you’d ‘like’ my G’day Souffle’ Facebook page- it would really make my day! Also, this is my ‘most popular post’, so I’d love to hear how your profiteroles turned out- please leave a comment below!

 

4.6 from 8 reviews
Profiteroles with Custard Cream and Chocolate Sauce
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: French
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 12
 
Soft pastry puffs filled with custard cream and filled with a rich chocolate sauce
Ingredients
  • For the Choux Pastry
  • 250 ml (1 cup) water
  • 90 g (6 tbsp.) butter, cubed
  • 150 g (1 cup) plain flour, sifted
  • pinch salt
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 3 - 4 large eggs
  • For the Custard Cream Filling
  • 250 ml (1 cup) milk
  • 175 ml (3/4 cup) heavy cream
  • 2 tsp vanilla favoring
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 75 g (1/3 cup) caster sugar
  • 50 g (1/3 cup) flour
  • For the Chocolate Sauce
  • 113 g (3/4 cup) dark baking chocolate
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 65 ml (1/4 cup) thickened cream
  • 2 tbs. sugar
Instructions
  1. For the Choux Pastry:
  2. Pre-heat oven to 425 F. (220 C.)
  3. Combine water and butter in a saucepan and bring just to the boil.
  4. Remove pan from the heat. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, salt and sugar. In one go, add these dry ingredients to the water/butter mixture.
  5. Over medium heat, stir with a wooden spoon until the mixture forms a dough and falls away from the sides of the pan. Remove from heat and let cool for 5 minutes.
  6. Beginning with three eggs, beat in one egg at a time, stirring in each egg until the dough mixture is smooth and the egg is fully incorporated. After the third egg, the dough should be elastic and fall easily away from your spoon or spatula. If the dough is still a bit stiff, then add another ½ egg or another full egg until the dough reaches the right consistency; the dough should not be 'runny' like pancake batter but smooth and elastic.
  7. Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Using a piping bag with a large tipped nozzle, pipe balls of dough onto the tray (spaced at least 2 inches apart), using about 2 tbsp. of dough for each ball. Pipe in concentric circles starting from the center and working outwards.
  8. Place in the oven and bake for 10 minutes at 425 F (220 C), then lower the temperature to 375 F. (190 C.) for the remaining 10-15 minutes. The pastry balls will be done when they puff up and become golden. Each ball should feel light and airy.
  9. Turn off oven and remove the tray from the oven; slit a small hole in the base of each pastry ball to release any steam. Return the tray to the oven for another few minutes to dry out the insides of the pastry puffs.
  10. For the Custard Cream Filling:
  11. Warm the milk, cream and vanilla flavouring together over medium heat- do not boil.
  12. In a separate bowl, whisk together the sugar and egg yolks for at least 30 seconds until the mixture becomes smooth and pale yellow in color, then add the flour.
  13. Over medium heat, gradually whisk in the egg/sugar mixture to the milk/cream mixture. Continue whisking until the mixture thickens- if the custard is so thick that it will not pour easily, then add a little more milk or cream. Place in the fridge until chilled; the custard will continue to thicken some as it chills.
  14. To fill each puff ball with custard, lift open the top of each pastry ball and fill with 1 -2 tbsp. of custard.
  15. For the Chocolate Sauce:
  16. Over low heat, melt together the chocolate and butter. Mix in the cream and sugar and stir until the sauce is thick and smooth.
  17. To serve, place one or two pastries on a plate and cover with chocolate sauce.

Save

Save

60 thoughts on “Profiteroles with Custard Cream and Chocolate Sauce

  1. I just made it. IT is HEAVEN! Thank you so much for the recipe. It turned out just fine. It took me more than 1 hour but maybe cause it was my first time. Also, I used semi-sweet chocolate and left the sugar part out because of that. Thank you again for the wonderful recipe.

  2. Hi. Thanks for this. I’ve used your recipe now a few times and it works great every time. Simple and straightforward and I am not an experienced baker by any means, I just enjoy an occasional foray into the kitchen for fun. Deserts especially my responsibility. The only thing I’ve changed is the sauce which I find gets a bit sticky if they’re not eaten right away so I just use plain chocolate although I use dark for me and milk chic for my wife. I make a batch and we eat them for the rest of the week though after the first few days they get a bit soggy. Plain chocolate without the cream, butter and sugar helps this a bit.

    • Awesome, thanks for that. I was wondering about freezing extra pastries after baking etc but decided it probably wouldn’t work. I’ll definitely try that next time, I like to scale up and store things. As a manufacturing factory owner I think in terms of time and motion.

      Now all I need is a dedicated freezer to the profiteroles and we’ll never run out.

      By the way I stuffed up the last batch by using just lightly oiled teflon coated baking trays rather than the baking paper I usually use. They stuck badly and didn’t bake right through despite having the same time as previous perfect batches. It does’t help this oven is not fan forced and they need the full 30 minutes at that. Thanks again.

      • Ooops I need to read more carefully. Oh well I can store a month’s worth of pastry balls anyway. That only needs a shelf though. 😉

  3. Hi – thank you so much for sharing your recipe. I had made some profiteroles and was looking for a chocolate sauce recipe and in searching came across your blog and this post. I whipped up this sauce and I have to say WOW. It is beautiful so rich and glossy. I doubled the quantities as my family are chocolate lovers. A couple of the profiteroles have been tested and the thumbs up was given. This will now be my only chocolate sauce recipe. Thank you:)

    I’ll be trying your profiterole and custard recipe soon too.
    Leanne recently posted…simple thingsMy Profile

  4. The pastry tasted more like pancake mix, not golden and crunchy at all like they should have been. The custard filling was way too sweet and had too much of an egg taste. I ended up binning the end product.

    • Thanks for your comment Susan. Sometimes these kinds of comments are helpful because it causes me to go back and test the recipe again. First of all, it sounds like your dough turned out to runny, like ‘pancake mix.’ This can happen if your eggs are too large or you use too many eggs. Therefore, I have changed the recipe to reduce the number of eggs from four to three eggs. This will ensure your dough will not be too runny. Be sure to mix in each individual egg thoroughly before adding the next egg. The ‘puff balls’ should turn out light and airy with a crisp outside.

      Second, you say the custard filling was too sweet. I just made another batch of the custard and I didn’t find it too sweet at all. Try reducing the amount of sugar to say 1/4 cup sugar instead of 1/3 cup. As far as your comment that the custard had ‘too much of an egg taste’, all I can say is that custard is supposed to taste like eggs since that it a main ingredient. I hope you try to make profiteroles again sometime: I know it took me several times to get them right!
      Fran recently posted…French Baked DonutsMy Profile

  5. Going to give these a crack on the weekend…never made choux before so keen for the challenge!

    Going to mix it up though and substitute the the vanilla for tequila and lime in the custard and chili chocolate icing! Wish me luck 🙂

      • Thanks! I’m curious about the choc sauce…does it ‘set’ firm at all or stay runny? Kinda wanting it to set and have a bit of a crack to it…do you think omitting or reducing the cream volume would give me a result I’m after?

        Don’t want to go as far as proper tempered chocolate (as I’ve also never done that and don’t have the thermometer required to do it) but want a choc top that isn’t free flowing. Cheers! 🙂

  6. Pete, the chocolate sauce is rather liquidy when you first pour it over the choux pastry, but then after a few minutes, it does set a bit, but not to the ‘crack’ stage. Yes, I think if you did omit the cream, it probably would harden some more. Try and experiment!
    Fran recently posted…Lobster Chartreuse – from my Paris balconyMy Profile

  7. What a fantastic recipe! I recently came back from Paris, and the profiteroles that I ate there inspired me to make them at home… The taste of these bought me straight back to a little cafe in Versailles 🙂 Amazing recipe and thank you for sharing.

  8. Thanks Fran…worked a treat! Left the tequila out as I was concerned it would curdle the custard…then proceeded to do just that by adding the lime juice to the milk/cream! haha
    Lesson learned, whisked the lime juice in with the sugar and egg yolks and all worked fine…chili chocolate with only a dash of cream and it set nice and thick

    https://imageshack.com/i/hjngICHVj

    Piping skills non too flash

    https://imageshack.com/i/exdfcRrdj

    Some baking/rising inconsistencies due to aforementioned poor piping skills, but overall, not bad if i do say so myself

    https://imageshack.com/i/pcUYnkL1j

  9. Made these yesterday for Xmas and my boys are such harsh critics but these were apparently “MAD” so thanks for the excellent recipe. They went a bit flat after they came out of the oven but that didn’t detract from the beautiful flavour at all.

    • Gail, thanks so much for stopping by and so great that your boys enjoyed the profiteroles. Profiteroles often do deflate after they come out of the oven, but they regain their shape when you place the custard cream inside.
      Fran recently posted…Christmas Black Forest ParfaitMy Profile

  10. Hi

    I have a question just about the custard, how long can you have the custard out in the open and not the fridge for in the profiteroles?

    thank you

  11. Thanks Juanita for stoping by my blog. Because the custard has dairy products in it (egg yolks, milk and cream), I wouldn’t leave it out of the fridge for say more than one hour (although the sugar acts as a preservative). Good luck with the recipe!
    Fran recently posted…French Baked DonutsMy Profile

  12. Thanks Maureen. My instructions for the recipe are a bit confusing, (I will fix this). I reduced the amount of eggs from four eggs to three in the ingredients list, but I forgot to change this in the instructions. Yes, you are right- add the eggs one at a time, but I always lightly whisk each one before adding it to the dough. Thanks for pointing these things out and I hope your profiteroles turn out good!
    Fran recently posted…French Baked DonutsMy Profile

  13. I made these today for a dinner party. It would be great if you could give a guide at how many this mix should produce. 2 tblsn was a little hard to judge. I think I made mine too small, and then had to guess cooking time – and they were slightly undercooked. Recipe was delicious, custard was lovely, and we served the chocolate sauce hot in individual jugs for consumption (I made twice the chocolate recipe). Thanks !

  14. Thanks Janine for your comment. This recipe makes about 10-12 individual profiteroles. It’s impossible to state an exact cooking time for this recipe, it depends on your oven and the size of your profiteroles. I always say between 20-30 minutes cooking time. You can tell they are cooked when they puff up and turn golden brown. At the end, be sure and make a slit on the bottom of each pastry and return them to the oven (turned off) for 1 -2 extra minutes to dry out the insides.
    Fran recently posted…Croissant French Toast Casserole + my blog 2 – year anniversaryMy Profile

  15. Has anyone tried them with a Honey or Caramel sauce I know strictly speaking a lot of people do not consider them true profiteroles but 1. not everyone can have and 2. some people do not like chocolate.

    They are yum I have done mine with both I think the honey wins though!

  16. I stumbled across this profiterole recipe and they looked delicious so I made them, however the choux pastry wasn’t light and airy at all! I followed the recipe exactly and had the right amount of ingredients but the all of my profiteroles turned out very heavy, nothing like a profiterole should be. The custard cream was also very thick and heavy. They were yummy, but way too heavy to be called a profiterole.

  17. When I made this recipe, the custard didn’t work.. There’s way too much flour so that when you mix egg yolks, sugar and flour together it forms a thick paste. It doesn’t flow. When I scooped half of this into the hot milk mixture, it became very thick. I found a few other similar recipes and they called for cornstarch instead of flour, maybe that would be different, will have to try..

    • Thanks for your comment, Ana. I just finished teaching this recipe to 18 students in my cooking class and they all turned out fine. But here are a few suggestions: try reducing the amount of flour from 1/3 cup to 1/4 cup for the custard. After you mix the eggs, sugar and flour together, the mixture should be a little ‘runny’ but not too thick. You should then gradually stir the egg mixture into the hot milk/cream mixture until it gradually thickens (do not ‘scoop’ it into the milk/cream). After you do this, it should still be a bit runny, but will then thicken more after you let it cool in the fridge. After the custard cools, it should be rather thick in consistency, after all, you don’t want to have runny custard inserted into your ‘puff balls.’ I hope you have another try!
      Fran recently posted…Fruit Tarts with almond cream fillingMy Profile

  18. Hi Aloesi, to be honest, I’ve never tried custard powder. From what I’ve read, custard powder tastes alright and suits people who can’t eat eggs. However, my opinion is that if you’re going to bother to make the other components from scratch (the choux pastry and the chocolate sauce), why not ‘go all the way’ and make the custard from scratch as well? Good luck with your profiteroles!
    Fran recently posted…Frozen Chocolate Nougat with Sour Cherry CoulisMy Profile

  19. Just made these. First time in many years. Great, straight forward recipe. A few hiccups but they tasted great and everyone was impressed. Will definitely try them again soon. Although the choux pastry turned out well I obviously mucked up the cooking. Good colour but some were crisp on the outside, some were not . By the time they were cooled down they were all soft rather than crisp. Should they be cooked longer? Do they need to be in an air tight container overnight? Love some feedback. Thank you.

  20. Thanks Sue for stopping by. In order to get the hard, crispy exterior of the choux pastry buns, they need to be put into a very hot oven at first, before reducing the heat. After pre-heating the oven at 425 F, I’d recommend baking your profiterole buns for a few minutes at 425 F, then reduce the heat to 375 for the remaining time until the buns turn golden (and yes, try baking them for a few minutes longer to get the crisp exterior, but careful not to burn them). Some people try spreading an egg wash on the buns before baking them in the oven, to get a crisp exterior. I haven’t tried that yet, but hope to soon. Yes, leave them in an air-tight container for storing, so they don’t get soggy. It does take a bit of practice for the profiteroles, however the good thing is that no matter how soggy they turn out, they still taste good!
    Fran recently posted…Mile-High Blueberry Muffins with Streusel ToppingMy Profile

  21. Thanks for the recipe, mine didn’t turn out quite right but the flavours were definitely there and i do have a query as a im a bit confused. You write 250ml water and 150g flour but you put 1 cup in brackets next to them? i don’t weight my ingredients so im wondering if having equal water and flour may have been an error on my part? Please clarify and thank you once again for the recipe :)!
    Cheers, Brenda

    • Thank you Brenda for your comment/question. Yes, the measurements of 1 cup each for both water and flour is correct. Liquids are usually measured in milliliters (mls) while flour and sugar are usually measured in grams- that’s why they have different numbers next to them (250 ml water vs 150 g flour). I recommend that you use a digital scale in order to get precise measurements which are essential for baking. Why didn’t your choux pastry turn out quite right? Maybe I can give you some suggestions.
      Fran recently posted…Authentic Coq au VinMy Profile

  22. After researching many many recipes, I’m so glad I chose your recipe! Following your exact instructions and ingredient amounts, my profiteroles were perfect and delicious. Your photo, however, showed a golden cream while my filling was beige! Perhaps the vanilla extract I used? Thank you!

  23. I made these yesterday, so easy and SO GOOD. LIKE I CAN’T EVEN DEAL WITH HOW GOOD THEY ARE. thank you!!!

Comments are closed.